Jonathan Smith

Jonathan Smith photo

Professor of English
Department of Literature, Philosophy, and the Arts
University of Michigan-Dearborn
4901 Evergreen Road
Dearborn, MI 48128

(313) 436-9187
(313) 593-1902 (fax)
e-mail: jonsmith@umich.edu

This home page is really a glorified c.v. I've presented the standard information in the standard way, but I've also included narrative about my research interests and my teaching, and I've constructed links to some of my recent scholarship and teaching materials. I hope this adds a bit more vitae to the curriculum.

Professional Experience Education Publications Works in Progress Honors and Awards Grants and Fellowships Conference Papers and Invited Talks Teaching Thesis Advising Service to the Profession University Service Memberships

















Professional Experience:

  • University of Michigan-Dearborn, Professor of English Language and Literature, 2005-
  • University of Michigan-Dearborn, Associate Dean, College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, 2006-09
  • University of Michigan-Dearborn, Director, Science and Technology Studies Program, 2002-2006, 2008-
  • Eastern New Mexico University, Jack Williamson Visiting Endowed Chair in Science and Humanities, Jan-May 2002
  • University of Michigan-Dearborn, Associate Professor of English Language and Literature, 1997-2005
  • University of Michigan-Dearborn, Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature, 1991-1997
  • Rutgers University, Visiting Part-Time Lecturer, 1987-1991

Education:

  • Ph.D., English, Columbia University, 1990

Dissertation Title: "Experimenting with Method: Science and Victorian Literature"
Director: Jonathan Arac

  • M.Phil., English, Columbia University, 1988
  • M.A., English, Columbia University, 1985
  • B.A., cum laude, English/Chemical Engineering (double major) Rice University, 1984

Publications:

Books:

  1. Charles Darwin and Victorian Visual Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Paperback edition: 2009.
  2. Fact and Feeling: Baconian Science and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1994.

Journal Issue:

  1. "Darwin and the Evolution of Victorian Studies." Special Issue of Victorian Studies 51.3 (Spring 2009).

 

Website:

  1. The Automobile in American Life and Society: Website and Online Archive. Launched September 2005. I served as project director for this site, which consists of ten scholarly essays, illustrated with archival materials from the collections of The Henry Ford and supplemented with extensive teaching resources and a group of digitized oral histories of major auto industry designers. I directed a team of scholars, archivists, curators, and librarians over a three-year period; edited the essays; and authored all the teaching resources.

 

Articles:

  1. “Evolutionary Aesthetics and Victorian Visual Culture.” Endless Forms: Charles Darwin, Natural Science, and the Visual Arts. Ed. Diana Donald. New Haven: Yale UP, 2009. 236-51.
  2. "Domestic Hybrids: Ruskin, Victorian Fiction, and Darwin's Botany." SEL: Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900 48 (2008): 861-70.
  3. Gender, Royalty, and Sexuality in John Gould’s Birds of Australia.” Victorian Literature and Culture 35 (2007): 569-87.
  4. "Picturing Sexual Selection: Gender and the Evolution of Ornithological Illustration in Charles Darwin's Descent of Man." Figuring It Out: Visual Languages of Gender in Science. Ed. Bernard Lightman and Ann  B. Shteir. Lebanon, NH: UP of New England, 2006. 85-109.
  5. "Grant Allen, Physiological Aesthetics, and the Dissemination of Darwin's Botany." Science Serialized: Representations of the Sciences in Nineteenth-Century Periodicals. Ed. Geoffrey N. Cantor and Sally Shuttleworth. Cambridge: MIT P, 2004. 285-306.
  6. "Une Fleur du Mal? Swinburne's 'The Sundew' and Darwin's Insectivorous Plants." Victorian Poetry 41 (2003): 131-50.
  7. "Philip Gosse and the Varieties of Natural Theology." Reinventing Christianity: Nineteenth-Century Contexts. Ed. Linda Woodhead. Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate, 2001. 251-62.
  8. "Charles Darwin, John Gould, and the Picturing of Natural Selection." The Book Collector 50 (2001): 51-76.
  9. "Darwin's Barnacles, Dickens's Little Dorrit, and the Social Uses of Victorian Seaside Studies." LIT: Literature, Interpretation, Theory 10 (2000): 327-47.
  10. "Is There A Hypertext in This Class?: Teaching Victorian Literature in the Electronic Age." Online. TLWC: Teaching Literature With Computers. (TLWC is now offline, but the article appears here as it did online.)
  11. "A Grammar of Dissent: Flatland, Newman, and the Theology of Probability." Victorian Studies 39 (1996-97): 129-50. (Co-authored with Gerald Baker and Lawrence Berkove, but I am listed first as the primary author.)
  12. "'Fill Up All the Gaps': Narrative and Illegitimacy in The Woman in White." Journal of Narrative Technique 26 (1996): 274-91. (Co-authored with Gwendolyn MacDonagh, one of my undergraduate students.)
  13. "What's All this Hype About Hypertext?: Teaching Literature with George P. Landow's The Dickens Web." Computers and the Humanities 30 (1996): 121-29.
  14. "'The Cock of Lordly Plume': Sexual Selection and The Egoist." Nineteenth-Century Literature 50 (1995-96): 51-77.
  15. "Heat and Modern Thought: The Forces of Nature in Our Mutual Friend." Victorian Literature and Culture 23 (1995): 37-69.
  16. "Art and Science: The Method of Ruskin's Modern Painters." Scientific Methods: Conceptual and Historical Problems. Ed. Peter Achinstein and Laura J. Snyder. Melbourne, FL: Krieger, 1994. 119-36.
  17. "De Quincey's Revisions to 'The System of the Heavens.'" Victorian Periodicals Review 26 (1993): 203-12.
  18. "The 'Wonderful Geological Story': Uniformitarianism and The Mill on the Floss." Papers on Language and Literature 27 (1991): 430-52.

 

Reviews and Short Articles:

  1. Review of Darwin’s Camera: Art and Photography in the Theory of Evolution, by Phillip Prodger. Isis (forthcoming).
  2. Review of The Earth on Show: Fossils and the Poetics of Popular Science, 1802-1856, by Ralph O’Connor, and Victorian Popularizers of Science: Designing Nature for New Audiences, by Bernard Lightman. American Historical Review 113 (2008): 1241-42.
  3. Review of The Evolutionary Imagination in Late-Victorian Novels: An Entangled Bank, by John Glendening. Victorian Studies 50 (2008):  487-89.
  4. Review of The Complete Work of Charles Darwin Online, ed. John van Wyhe. Journal of Victorian Culture 13.1 (2008): 114-19.
  5. “Darwin and the Aesthetes.” Review of Darwin, Literature, and Victorian Respectability, by Gowan Dawson. Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies 4.1 (2008). <http://www.ncgsjournal.com/issue41/smith.htm>.
  6. Review of Literary Darwinism: Evolution, Human Nature, and Literature, by Joseph Carroll. Victorian Studies 48 (2006): 573-74.
  7. “Elizabeth Gould,” for Dictionary of Nineteenth-Century British Scientists, ed. Bernard Lightman (Bristol: Thoemmes, 2004).
  8. Review of Victorian Relativity: Radical Thought and Scientific Discovery, by Christopher Herbert. Clio 32 (2003): 222-27.
  9. Review of Charles Darwin: The Life of a Revolutionary Thinker, by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent. Quarterly Review of Biology 77 (2002): 175-76.
  10. Review of Frankenstein's Children: Electricity, Exhibition, and Experiment in Early-Nineteenth-Century London, by Iwan Rhys Morus, and Mesmerized: Powers of Mind in Victorian Britain, by Alison Winter. Nineteenth-Century Prose 28 (2001): 111-13.
  11. Review of Erasmus Darwin: A Life of Unequalled Achievement, by Desmond King-Hele. Interdisciplinary Science Reviews 25.1 (2000): 69-71.
  12. Review of Darwinian Myths, by Edward Caudill, and Paul Ekman's edition of Charles Darwin's Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals. Nineteenth-Century Prose 27 (2000): 101-04.
  13. "The Cuckoo's Contested History," Trends in Ecology and Evolution 14 (1999):  415.
  14. Review of Seeing New Worlds: Henry David Thoreau and Nineteenth-Century Natural Science, by Laura Dassow Walls. Annals of Science 55 (1998): 434-35.
  15. Review of Meredith and the Novel, by Neil Roberts. Studies in the Novel 30 (1998): 601-03.
  16. Review of G.H. Lewes: A Life, by Rosemary Ashton. Configurations 2 (1994): 365-67.
  17. Review of Thomas Henry Huxley: Communicating for Science, by J. Vernon Jensen. Victorian Studies 36 (1992-1993): 248-49.
  18. Review of Flatland, by Edwin A. Abbott, ed. Thomas Banchoff. Victorian Studies 36 (1992-1993): 94-95.

Works in Progress:

  1. “The Novel and Science.” Oxford Handbook to the Victorian Novel (Oxford: Oxford UP). Ed. Lisa Rodensky. Under contract; 9000-word essay submitted.
  2. Negotiating Boundaries. Vol. 1 of Victorian Science and Literature. General Editors Gowan Dawson and Bernard Lightman. A collection of annotated primary sources on the relationship between science and literature in Victorian Britain, co-edited with Piers Hale. In production with Pickering and Chatto.
  3. “The Luckiest Man: A Brief History of Time and The Pride of the Yankees.”

Honors and Awards:

  • Distinguished Faculty Research Award. University of Michigan-Dearborn, 2008.
  • Jack Williamson Visiting Endowed Chair in Science and Humanities, Eastern New Mexico University, 2002.
  • Nominee, Modern Language Association Prize for a First Book, 1995. For Fact and Feeling.
  • NEH Summer Seminar. "Methodological Debates in 19th-Century Physics," The Johns Hopkins University, 1992. Director: Peter Achinstein.
  • Schachterle Prize, The Society for Literature and Science, Best Essay in Literature and Science by an Untenured Scholar, 1992. Awarded for "The 'Wonderful Geological Story': Uniformitarianism and The Mill on the Floss."

 Grants and Fellowships:

  • Faculty Research Initiation and Seed Grant. “Evolution and Ornithology: John Gould and Alfred Newton.” Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, University of Michigna-Dearborn. $6,000 for archival research in Great Britain. 2010.
  • Michigan Humanities Council. “Motor City Voices: Race, Labor, and De-Industrialization.” $15,000 for a museum exhibit on the Revolutionary Union Movement among African-American autoworkers in the 1960s and ‘70s, to be displayed at the University of Michigan-Dearborn’s Berkowitz Gallery, The Henry Ford’s Ford Rouge Factory Tour Visitor Center, and the Charles H. Wright Museum of African-American History. (With Bruce Pietrykowski.) 2006.
  • Publication Subvention Award. “Charles Darwin and Victorian Visual Culture.” Office of the Vice President for Research, University of Michigan. $2700 to pay for illustrations in book of the same title. 2004.
  • NEH Education Demonstration and Development Grant. "The Automobile in American Life and Society: A Web Site and Online Archive." $220,000 ($210,000 outright; $10,000 matching) for the creation of a web site and oral history archive of auto industry engineers and designers to accompany UM-Dearborn's Program in Science and Technology Studies of the Automobile. A collaboration with The Henry Ford. 2002. $10,000 in matching funds for this project secured from DaimlerChrysler Corporation Fund.
  • NEH Humanities Focus Grant. "Science and Technology Studies of the Automobile." $24,370 for a faculty reading group, external consultants, and course development stipends to initiate a program at UM-Dearborn in Science and Technology Studies with special attention on the automobile's impact on American life, labor, and culture. (With Greg Field and Bruce Pietrykowski.) 2000.
  • Rackham Faculty Grant. "Seeing Things: Darwin and Victorian Visual Culture." Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. $7000 to support travel for archival research in Great Britain. 1999.
  • NEH Fellowship. "Seeing Things: Image, Text, and Victorian Culture in the Darwinian Debates." $24,000 for salary support in 2000. 1998.
  • Visiting Fellowship, Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities, Vanderbilt University. Year-long residential fellowship on the Center's 1999-2000 theme, "Constructions, Destructions, and Deconstructions of Nature." 1999. (Alternate)
  • ACLS Fellowship. "Seeing Things: The Visual and Textual Languages of Victorian Science." $20,00 for sabbatical-year salary support in 1997-98. 1997. (Alternate)
  • Chancellor's Technology Iniatives Award. University of Michigan-Dearborn. $625 for purchase of network upgrade of Storyspace hypertext software for use in Victorian literature classes. 1997.
  • Faculty Research Grant. "The Almighty Designer: The Victorian Search for God in the Architecture of Man and Nature." University of Michigan-Dearborn. $1000 to support archival research in Great Britain. 1996.
  • Rackham Faculty Fellowship. "John Gould's Bird Books and the Visual Response to Darwinism." Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. $7000 in summer salary support. 1995.
  • Rackham Faculty Grant. "John Gould's Bird Books and the Visual Response to Darwinism." Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. $2,800 to support travel for archival research in the U.S. 1995.
  • NEH Summer Stipend. "Scientific Image and Literary Text in Victorian Representations of Nature." $4000. 1994.
  • NEH Younger Scholars Award. "Alchemy, Romanticism, and Frankenstein." $2500 to support a student research project. (With Jennifer O'Meara.) 1994.
  • Faculty Research Grant. "John Gould's Bird Books and the Visual Response to Darwinism." University of Michigan-Dearborn. $800 to support archival research in the United States. 1994.
  • Faculty Research Grant. "Scientific Image and Literary Text in Victorian Representations of Nature." University of Michigan-Dearborn. $1500 to support archival research in Great Britain. 1994.
  • Preliminary/Small Scale Project Grant. "The Eye's Mind: Scientific Image and Literary Text in Victorian Britain." Office of the Vice President for Research, University of Michigan. $5000 to support archival research in Great Britain. 1993.
  • Research Assistance Award. "Architecture and Induction: Whewell and Ruskin on Gothic." University of Michigan-Dearborn. $535 to hire a student research assistant. 1993.
  • Educational Enhancement Grant. "Science and Literature." University of Michigan-Dearborn. $883 for materials to support a new course in science and literature. 1992.
  • Educational Enhancement Grant. "Literature on Video." University of Michigan-Dearborn. $451 for purchase of educational videos to support the teaching of Restoration drama and Romantic poetry. 1992.
  • Elliot Dobbie Dissertation Grant. Columbia University. $250 to support preparation of dissertations solicited for publication. 1991.

Conference Papers and Invited Talks: 

  • “Charles Darwin, Evolutionary Aesthetics, and Victorian Visual Culture.” University of Michigan-Dearborn Graduate Liberal Studies Conference, May, 2010, Dearborn, MI.
  • “Charles Darwin, Evolutionary Aesthetics, and Victorian Visual Culture.” Monmouth College Darwinpalooza, February, 2010, Monmouth, IL.
  • “Charles Darwin, Evolutionary Aesthetics, and Victorian Visual Culture.” Wayne State University, November 2009, Detroit, MI.
  • “Charles Darwin, John Gould, and Australian Birds.” Gould Centennial Lecture. University of Melbourne (AUS). In conjunction with the exhibition Reframing Darwin: Evolution and the Arts in Australia, Ian Potter Museum of Art, October, 2009.
  • “Audubon and John Gould.” Picturing John James Audubon: NEH Summer Institute. July, 2009, Bloomington, IN.
  • Darwin, Photography, and The Expression of the Emotions.” The Art of Evolution: Charles Darwin and Visual Cultures. Courtauld Institute of Art, July, 2009, London.
  • “Charles Darwin, Evolutionary Aesthetics, and Victorian Visual Culture.” Chelsea Physic Garden, July, 2009, London.
  • “1859: A Tipping Point for Evolution?” Jane Stedman Lecture, Midwest Victorian Studies Association, April, 2009, Richmond, IN. 
  • Darwin, Evolutionary Aesthetics, and Victorian Visual Culture.” Yale Center for British Art. Lecture in conjunction with the exhibition, Endless Forms: Charles Darwin, Natural Science, and the Visual Arts. February, 2009, New Haven, CT. 
  • Darwin, Evolutionary Aesthetics, and Victorian Visual Culture.” Evolution: The Experience, Melbourne, Australia, February, 2009.
  • Respondent, “The Uglies of Nature: Observation and Aesthetics in the Oceans.” History of Science Society, November, 2008, Pittsburgh, PA.
  • “Evolutionary Aesthetics.” Darwin and Design, Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, May, 2008, Evanston, IL.
  • “Picturing Natural Selection: Charles Darwin and Victorian Visual Culture.” Oakland University, Department of Biological Sciences Seminar Series, April, 2008. Rochester Hills, MI.
  • “Darwin and the Sensation Novelists.” Indiana University, Departments of English and History, January, 2008.
  • Darwin and the Victorian (Domesticated) Animal,” The Victorian Animal, CUNY Graduate Center, May, 2007, New York, NY.
  • “Domestic Hybrids: Sensation Fiction, Sexuality, and Darwin’s Different Forms of Flowers,” Modern Language Association, December, 2004, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Invited Keynote Speaker, Association of Graduate Liberal Studies Programs, October, 2004, Charlotte, NC.
  • “John Ruskin, Charles Darwin, and the Threat of a Naturalized Aesthetics,” North American Victorian Studies Association, October, 2003, Bloomington, IN.
  • "Royal Figures: Gender, Sexuality, and Domesticity in John Gould's The Birds of Australia," The Figural Vocabularies of Gender in Nineteenth-Century Science, May, 2002, Toronto, ON.
  • Grant Allen, Physiological Aesthetics, and the Dissemination of Darwin's Botany," Science in the Nineteenth-Century Periodical, April, 2001, Boston, MA.
  • Respondent, "Sexual Selection and Victorian Narrative," Modern Language Association, December, 1999, Chicago, IL.
  • "Classification and Culture: Darwin's Barnacles and Dickens's Little Dorrit," Modern Language Association, December, 1999, Chicago, IL.
  • "Darwin's Barnacles and Dickens's Little Dorrit," History of Science Society, November, 1999, Pittsburgh, PA, and Society for Literature and Science, October, 1999, Norman, OK
  • "The New Uses of Texts," Midwest Meeting of the American Association of University Presses, "Text and Technology," September, 1999, Ann Arbor, MI.
  • "Image and Text: John Gould, Charles Darwin, and the Picturing of Natural Selection," Society for the History of Natural History, "Drawing From Nature: Illustration in the Natural History Sciences," April, 1999,  Natural History Museum, London.
  • "Queer Plants: Sexuality, Sensation Fiction, and Darwin's Botany," Society for Literature and Science, November, 1998, Gainesville, FL.
  • "Picturing Natural Selection: Illustration in Darwin's Botanical Works and John Ruskin's Proserpina," Society for Literature and Science, November, 1998, Gainesville, FL.
  • "Science, Culture, and History: P.H. Gosse and Darwin's Barnacles," Society for Literature and Science, October, 1997, Pittsburgh, PA.
  • "Eden Under Water: The Visual Natural Theology of P.H. Gosse's Aquarium Books," Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Society, July, 1997, Lancaster, England.
  • "The Birds of Darwin and John Gould: Sexual Selection and Victorian Culture," Society for Literature and Science, October, 1996, Atlanta, GA.
  • "The Engineer as Humanist," Alpha Pi Mu (University of Michigan-Dearborn Chapter) Induction Ceremony, May, 1996, Dearborn, MI.
  • "Is Science Social?: John Gould's Bird Books and the Visual Response to Darwin," University of Michigan-Dearborn Natural Science Colloquium, October, 1995, Dearborn, MI.
  • "The Implications for Naturalism in Nineteenth-Century British Debates on the Methods of Science and Literature," International Association for the Study of Emile Zola and Naturalism, September, 1995, Las Vegas, NV.
  • "Birds of a Feather?: John Gould's Bird Books and the Visual Response to Darwinism," Northeast Victorian Studies Association, April, 1995, Boston, MA.
  • "Alchemy, Romanticism, and Frankenstein," Society for Literature and Science, November, 1994, New Orleans, LA. (With Jennifer O'Meara.)
  • "Hypertext and the Victorian Serial," Society for Literature and Science, November, 1994, New Orleans, LA.
  • "Architecture and Induction: Whewell and Ruskin on Gothic," British Society for the History of Science, "Science and British Culture in the 1830s," July, 1994, Trinity College, Cambridge.
  • "Using Independent Study and the NEH Younger Scholars Program to Facilitate Faculty-Student Research Collaboration in the Humanities," University of Michigan-Dearborn/University of Michigan-Flint Annual Conference on Faculty-Student Research Collaboration, May, 1994, Dearborn, MI.
  • "The Master of the Proceedings: A Brief History of Hawking," Society for Literature and Science, November, 1993, Boston, MA.
  • Facilitator, "Meaningful Writing Assignments in Chemistry," Michigan College Chemistry Teachers Association, November, 1993, Dearborn, MI.
  • "Heat and Modern Thought: The Forces of Nature in Household Words, All the Year Round, and Our Mutual Friend," Research Society for Victorian Periodicals, October, 1993, Ann Arbor, MI.
  • "Eyes on the Skies: John Herschel, Thomas De Quincey, and the Great Nebula in Orion," University of Michigan-Dearborn, Department of Humanities, Humanitas Lecture, February, 1993.
  • "'The Abysses of the Heavenly Wilderness': Thomas De Quincey, John Herschel, and J.P. Nichol Confront the Great Nebula in Orion," Midwest Modern Language Association, November, 1992, St. Louis, MO.
  • "Intruding in the Garden of Eden: The Rhetorical Transformation of Nature in Gosse's Father and Son," Society for Literature and Science, October, 1992, Atlanta, GA.
  • "Interdisciplinarity and the English Curriculum," Michigan College English Association, October, 1992, Benton Harbor, MI.
  • "'The Abysses of the Heavenly Wilderness': Thomas De Quincey, J.P. Nichol, and the Earl of Rosse Confront the Great Nebula in Orion," Northeast Victorian Studies Association, April, 1992, New Brunswick, NJ.
  • "'Euclid Honourably Shelved': Edwin Abbott's Flatland and the Popularization of Non-Euclidean Geometry," Society for Literature and Science, October, 1991, Montreal, Canada.
  • "'Seeing Through Lyell's Eyes': The Uniformitarian Imagination and The Voyage of the Beagle," Society for Literature and Science, October, 1990, Portland, OR.

Teaching:

My normal teaching load is three courses per semester. I'm responsible for all courses in nineteenth-century British literature, so I teach one upper-level course in the Romantics or the Victorians each semester. As the list below indicates, I've taught a wide variety of nineteenth-century courses, topics courses as well as standard period/genre surveys. My other two courses generally consist of some combination of an introductory literature course (the second half of the English literature survey or Introduction to Drama), a course for one of our interdisciplinary programs (such as our new undergraduate Science and Technology Studies Program or our master's program in Liberal Studies), a topics course in literature (such as Classical Literature in Translation).

My research interests in Literature and Science and Science and Technology Studies have led not only to the creation and teaching of new courses in these areas but to program development. I taught an undergraduate course on Literature and Science in 1993 that I subsquently re-vamped as a graduate seminar on "Literature, Science, and Science Studies" for our master's program in Liberal Studies. In 1991 and 2000 I taught a course I developed on Darwin and Victorian Culture. In 2000 I spearheaded the effort to create a Science and Technology Studies Program at UMD with a special focus on the automobile and automobile industry. With funding from the NEH, we brought together an interdisciplinary group of faculty for reading, discussion, and program design. The STS Program and Minor were approved in early 2002 and launched in the Fall of that year. I designed and taught the inaugural offering of the introductory course for the Program on "The Automobile in American Life and Society." I am currently serving as the Director both of the STS Program and of a second NEH-funded project to create a web site that will accompany the Program but will also be available to teachers and students elsewhere. Working with The Henry Ford, we are constructing a site that includes overview essays and case studies by five distinguished scholars on the automobile and labor, gender, design, the environment, and race. In addition, the site will include a collection of oral histories taken from auto industry designers.

My teaching style in the literature classroom blends Socratic questioning and discussion with individual and small-group activities. I lecture when I feel I need to, but I try to keep it to a minimum. I treat writing assignments as I do in my composition classes: students are required to write rough drafts and to critique the drafts of other students in their peer group. 

For over a decade I have incorporated technology into my literature classes fairly extensively, employing email and bulletin boards for out-of-class discussion, utilizing Web sites in paper assignments and homework exercises, and, in some cases, requiring students to conduct a research project that is conceived hypertextually and becomes part of a class-constructed web on a particular work, with links among the various individual projects. When the Web was in its infancy, I used Storyspace hypertext software and George Landow's Storyspace webs on Great Expectations and In Memoriam. Now these classes build webs directly on the WWW. In 1997, my class on the Victorian Novel launched a web on Bronte's Jane Eyre entitled "Charlotte's Web" and in 1999 the same class used that web as both a resource and a model for their own web, called "Pip's World," on Great Expectations. Classes in 2001, 2003, and 2005 have added to those original webs. For the one in 2007 I moved to a wiki on Charles Kingsley's The Water Babies; that project, however, is not available on the web.

My use of Storyspace is related to another of my pedagogical interests: undergraduate research. I've been actively involved in the annual "Meeting of Minds" conference on undergraduate research held with students from our campus, the University of Michigan-Flint, and Oakland University; I've worked closely with our librarians and Writing Program on ways to enhance research across the curriculum; and I try to work with talented individual students on independent research projects whose goal is national conference presentations and publications. I've directed an NEH-funded student project on alchemy and Frankenstein and presented a paper with the student at the Society for Literature and Science conference, co-authored a journal article on The Woman in White with another, had a third publish an article in ISLE, and have directed roughly a dozen independent study projects. At the graduate level, I directed the Master's Thesis of Carolyn Reese on "Anne Bronte and Universal Salvation," while another student's independent study project resulted in an article on Brian Greene's The Elegant Universe in Public Understanding of Science.

I've been creating web sites for all my courses since 1998. In some cases, particularly when creating an online coursepack, I utilize our library's Electronic Reserves system; these course spaces are password-protected and thus not accessible.

  • Literature, Science, and Science Studies (Graduate) (This course is password-protected, so the link is to the syllabus only.)
  • Science and Literature (an undergraduate topics course taught both at UM-Dearborn and Eastern New Mexico University)
  • Introduction to Science and Technology Studies: The Automobile in American Life and Society (This course is password protected, so the materials are not accessible.) (Taught in both traditional and online versions.)
  • Car Culture (a seminar for first-year students; this course is password protected, so the materials are not accessible)
  • What Are You Going To Do With That? The Liberal Arts and the Professions (a seminar for first-year students, linked with a career-planning course)
  • Hypertext and the Victorian Novel (My first use of Storyspace software, offered before the WWW existed.)
  • Women and the English Novel, 1792-1869
  • The Pre-Raphaelites (Part of this course is password-protected, but the bulk of the course materials is accessible.)
  • The Radical Romantics: The Godwins, The Shelleys, and Byron
  • Darwin in Victorian Literature and Culture (This course is password protected, so the materials are not accessible.)
  • Nineteenth-Century English Novel
  • Survey of Victorian Literature
  • Survey of English Literature in the Romantic Era
  • English Literature 1660 to Present
  • Classical Literature in Translation
  • Introduction to English Studies (gateway course for English majors)
  • Introduction to Literature: Drama
  • Composition I and II (Computer Aided)
  • Honors Composition (linked with both Western Culture II: The Middle Ages and the Renaissance and Western Culture I: The Ancient World)
  • Basic Composition, Expository Writing, and Advanced Composition (Rutgers University)

Thesis Advising:

  • Jennifer De Long, “Alchemists, Epics, and Heroes.” Ph.D. in English, University of Illinois. Completed November 2007. Committee Member.
  • Carolyn Bacon, “Anne Bronte and Universal Salvation.” Master’s of Liberal Studies. Completed December 2005.
  • Jennifer Gerstel, "Sexual Selection and Mate Choice in Darwin, Eliot, Gaskell, and Hardy." Ph.D. in English, University of Toronto. Completed 2002. External Examiner for oral defense.

Service to the Profession:

  • Foreign Corresponding Editor, Journal of Victorian Culture (2001- ).
  • Evaluator for MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Program, 2010.
  • Panelist, NEH Grants for Teaching and Learning Resources and Curriculum Development, 2006.
  • Manuscript Reviewer for PMLA, Cambridge University Press, Victorian Studies, Isis, Ohio State University Press, Journal of Victorian Culture, Journal of Narrative Theory, SEL: Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, McGraw-Hill.
  • Proposal reviewer for Cambridge University Press, NEH Collaborative Projects, Broadview Press, The Library of America, Bucknell University Press.
  • Promotion Reviewer for Haverford College and Bucknell University.
  • Editorial Board, TLWC: Teaching Literature With Computers. 1997-98.

University Service:

English Discipline:

  • Member, Curriculum Review Committee, 2002-05 (Chair 2003-05). Led a complete overhaul of the English major.
  • Coordinator, English Discipline Self-Study, 1995-96
  • Coordinator, English Discipline Assessment Plan, 1994-95
  • English Discipline Library Liaison, 1992-97
  • English Discipline Faculty Advisor, 1993-95
  • English Discipline Assistant Library Liaison, 1991-92
  • Member, Composition Advisory Committee, 1991-92, 1995-96

Humanities Department/Department of Literature, Philosophy, and the Arts:

  • Chair, Early Modern/Renaissance Literature and Culture Search Committee, 2004-05
  • Chair, American Literature and Culture Search Committee, 2003-04
  • Chair, 18th-Century Studies Search Committee, 2002-03
  • Member, Medievalist Search Committee, 2001
  • Associate Chair, 1998-99
  • Member, Promotion and Tenure Committee, 1997-
  • Ex-Officio Member, Department Executive Committee, 1998-99
  • At-Large Member, Department Executive Committee, 1995-96, 1997
  • Member, Composition Search Committee, 1992-93, 1996-97

College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters:

  • Associate Dean, 2006-09. Primary responsibility for interdisciplinary programs, undergraduate research and learning opportunities, distance learning, technology support and web site.
  • Director, Science and Technology Studies, 2002-06
  • Chair, Distance Learning Advisory Committee, 2006-09
  • Chair, Bachelor of General Studies/Liberal Studies Advisory Committee, 2006-09
  • Member, Reconstituted Promotion & Tenure Committee (for promotions to full professor), 2005
  • Member, Full Professor Review Committee, 2003
  • Member and Coordinator, Pilot First-Year Seminars Committee, 2003-04
  • Member, CASL Executive Committee, 1998-2000 (voting), 2006-09 (ex officio)
  • Member, CASL Administrative Council, 2006-09
  • Member, "Meeting of Minds" Steering Committee, 1994-97, 1998-2000
  • Attendee, Council on Undergraduate Research Institute, "How to Institutionalize Undergraduate Research," Asheville, NC, March, 1997
  • Member, Academic Standards Committee, 1993-95
  • Faculty Marshall, Commencements of Fall 1991, Winter 1995, and Winter 2007

University of Michigan-Dearborn Campus:

  • Chair, CASL Dean Search Committee, 2009-10
  • Member, Web Strategy Team, 2009-10
  • Member, William E. Stirton Professor Selection Committee, 2007
  • Coordinator, Technology & Culture Forum, 2005
  • Member, Provost’s Ad Hoc Advisory Committee for a Faculty Lounge, 2002-03
  • Member, Graduate Board, 1998-2000
  • Member, Research Support Committee, 1996-99
  • Member, Values Team, FUTURES Strategic Planning Initiative, 1998-99
  • Member, Search Committee for Information Services Librarian, 1998
  • Member, Committee on PREMIER Research Education Initiative, 1996-97
  • Member, Ad Hoc Committee on UM-Dearborn Agenda for Women, 1996
  • Member, Library and Information Technology Advisory Committee, 1994-97
  • Member, Library Advisory Committee, 1992-94
  • Panelist, New Faculty Orientation, 1994, 1995, 1997
  • Member, Ad Hoc Library Committee on Serials, 1993-94

University of Michigan System:

  • Member, Selection Committee, Jackie Lawson Memorial Faculty Governance Award, 2003-05
  • Member, Rackham Divisional Board (Humanities and the Arts), 1997-99

Memberships:

  • Modern Language Association
  • North American Victorian Studies Association
  • Northeast Victorian Studies Association
  • Midwest Victorian Studies Association
  • Interdisciplinary Nineteenth Century Society
  • Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts
  • History of Science Society
  • British Society for the History of Science
  • Society for the History of Technology