The National Black Feminist Organization’s Statement of Purpose, 1973


The distorted male-dominated media image of the Women’s Liberation Movement has clouded the vital and revolutionary importance of this movement to Third World women, especially black women.  The Movement has been characterized as the exclusive property of so-called white middle-class women and any black women seen involved in this movement have been seen as “selling out,” “dividing the race,” and an assortment of nonsensical epithets.  Black feminists resent these charges and have therefore established The National Black Feminist Organization, in order to address ourselves to the particular and specific needs of the larger, but almost cast-aside half of the black race in Amerikkka, the black woman.


Black women have suffered cruelly in this society from living the phenomenon of being black and female, in a country that is both racist and sexist.  There has been very little real examination of the damage it has caused on the lives and on the minds of black women. Because we live in a patriarchy, we have allowed a premium to be put on black male suffering. No one of us would minimize the pain or hardship or the cruel and inhumane treatment experienced by the black man.  But history, past or present, rarely deals with the malicious abuse put upon the black woman.  We were seen as breeders by the master; despised and historically polarized from/by the master’s wife; and looked upon as castrators by our lovers and husbands.  The black woman has had to be strong, yet we are persecuted for having survived.  We have been called “matriarchs” by white racists and black nationalists; we have virtually no positive self-images to validate our existence.  Black women want to be proud, dignified, and free from all those false definitions of beauty and woman hood that are unrealistic and unnatural.  We, not white men or black men, must define our own self-image as black women and not fall into the mistake of being placed upon the pedestal which is even being rejected by white women.  It has been hard for black women to emerge from the myriad of distorted images that have portrayed us as grinning Beulahs, castrating Sapphires, and pancake-box Jemimas.  As black feminists we realized the need to establish ourselves as an independent black feminist organization.  Our above ground presence will lend enormous credibility to the current Women’s Liberation Movement, which unfortunately is not seen as the serious political and economic revolutionary force that it is.  We will strengthen the current efforts of the Black Liberation struggle in this country by encouraging all of the talents and creativities of black women to emerge, strong and beautiful, not to feel guilty or divisive, and assume positions of leadership and honor in the black community.  We will encourage the black community to stop falling into the trap of the white male Left, utilizing women only in terms of domestic or servile needs.  We will continue to remind the Black Liberation Movement that there can’t be liberation for half the race.  We must, together, as a people, work to eliminate racism, from without the black community, which is trying to destroy us as an entire people; but we must remember that sexism is destroying and crippling us from within.