ANNE DANIELSON-FRANÇOIS

Assistant Professor of Biology

Department of Natural Sciences
University of Michigan-Dearborn
Dearborn, Michigan 48128-1491


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Professional Preparation

University of Arizona Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Ph.D. 2002
University of Arizona Ecology and Evolutionary Biology M.A. 1999
Swarthmore College Biology B.A. 1990

Appointments

Assistant Professor Division of Biology, Dept. of Natural Sciences, University of Michigan-Dearborn 2007-present
Huxley Faculty Fellow Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology,
Rice University
2004-2007.
Ecological Genetics
Postdoctoral Fellow
Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology,
University of Kansas
2003-2004
Postdoctoral Fellow Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology,
University of Kansas
2002-2003
Teaching Assistant,
Evolution, Genetics, Marine Discovery, Introductory Biology
Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Arizona
1996-1997
Laboratory Coordinator Dept. of Biology, Swarthmore College 1991-1995
Research Technician,
Molecular Neurobiology
Dept. of Biology, Swarthmore College 1990-1991

Awards and Honors

Awarded Grant Proposals

EIC Environmental-Sustainability Research Grant (PI), “Toxic web: tracking pollutants across ecological webs,” University of Michigan - Dearborn, $12,000, 2012.

Step 2 Research Grant (PI), “Toxic web: tracking pollutants across trophic levels,” Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, University of Michigan – Dearborn, $15,000 2011.

AT&T Technology Grant (co-PI), “Using Communication Technology to Assess and Reduce Environmental Impact” co-PI with Drs. K. Murray and J. Napieralski, $25,000, 2010.

NSF-MRI. National Science Foundation, OIA Proposal #1039817 (co-PI), “Acquisition of a Zeta Potential and Submicron Particle Size Analyzer to Enhance Research and Teaching at the University of Michigan-Dearborn,” co-PI with Drs. K. Bandyopadhyay, V. Naik, and M. Twiner, $94,821, 2010.

Research Materials Grant (PI), “Acquisition of Microscope Upgrade (DIC lens with DAPI imaging filter)” with co-PI Drs. Twiner and R. Abu-Issa, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, University of Michigan-Dearborn, $4,755, 2010.

Rackham Faculty Fellowship (PI), "Tracking pollutants across trophic levels" University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, $15,000, 2008.

Faculty Research Initiation Grant (PI), "Sperm competition in the Giant Wood spider Nephila pilipes" Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, the University of Michigan-Dearborn, $6,000, 2007.

Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant (PI), “Life history variation in the Tetragnathidae” National Science Foundation,  $7,650, 2000.

Research Support Award (PI), Center for Insect Science, University of Arizona, $1,500, 2001.

Grant for Undergraduate Research (PI), Analysis of Biological Diversification NSF Research Training Grant, University of Arizona, $1000, 2001.

Research Grant (PI), Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, $500, 2001.

Research Grant (PI), Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, $490, 1999.

Post-Course Grant (co-PI), Organización para Estudios Tropicales, La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, $486, 1998.

Research Grant (PI), Analysis of Biological Diversification NSF Research Training Grant, University of Arizona, $600, 1997.

HHMI Summer Fellowship Program (PI), Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Swarthmore College, $300 and summer stipend for high school student, 1994.

Teaching Experience

Special Courses

Molecular Phylogenetics. J. Felsenstein. Seattle Summer Institute in Statistical Genetics. Summer, 2007.

Quantitative Genetics, QTL Mapping I and II. T. MacKay, Z-B, Zeng, R. Doerge, R. Bastien. North Carolina Summer Institute, Raleigh, North Carolina. Summer, 2001.

Tropical Biology. The Organization for Tropical Studies, University of Costa Rica, San Jose, Costa Rica, Summer, 1998.

 

Publications (* indicates undergraduate)

  1. Danielson-François, A., C. Fetterer*, and P. Smallwood. 2002. Body condition and mate choice in Tetragnatha elongata (Araneae: Tetragnathidae). Journal of Arachnology 30:20-30.
  2. Danielson-François, A. and T. Bukowski. 2005. Equal sperm release by males despite dramatic differences in copulatory duration for the orb-weaving spider Tetragnatha versicolor (Araneae, Tetragnathidae). Journal of Insect Behavior 18:131-148.
  3. Danielson-François, A. 2006. Mating behavior and sperm release in the haplogyne Glenognatha emertoni (Araneae: Tetragnathidae). Journal of Arachnology 34:387-398.
  4. Danielson-François, A., J. K. Kelly, and M. D. Greenfield. 2006. Genotype x environment interaction for male attractiveness in an acoustic moth: evidence for plasticity and canalization. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 19: 532-542.
  5. Danielson-François, A., Y. Zhou, and M. D. Greenfield. 2009. Indirect genetic effects and the lek paradox: inter-genotypic competition may strengthen genotype x environment interactions and conserve genetic variance. Genetica, 136:27-36.
  6. Carrillo, J., Danielson-François, A., Siemann, E., and L. Meffert. 2012. Male-biased sex ratio increases female egg laying and fitness in the housefly Musca domestica. Journal of Ethology DOI 10.1007/s10164-011-0317-6
  7. Bleakley, B. and A. Danielson-François. In press. Behavioral Genetics: Beyond Nature and Nurture, in Animal Behavior: Volume I Causation and Development, K. Yasukawa ed. Westport, Praeger Publishers.
  8. Danielson-François, A., Hou, C., Cole*, N., and I-M. Tso. Scramble competition for molting females as a driving force for extreme male dwarfism in spiders. Animal Behavior, accepted June 2012

Submitted

In preparation

Invited Presentations

  1. Portland State University. 2011. Sperm competition in spiders: lessons from behavioral and morphological studies. Invited colloquium speaker, Department of Biology, host S. Masta.
  2. Eastern Michigan University. 2010. Sperm competition in orb-weaving spiders. Invited colloquium speaker, Department of Biology, host P. Bednekoff.
  3. Animal Behavior Society. 2009. Competing phenotypes- assessing the impact of indirect genetic effects on sexually-selected traits. Part of NSF-funded symposium panel at the international meetings in Pirenopolis, Brazil.
  4. University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. 2009. Indirect genetic effects and the lek paradox. Noon seminar series, host Liz Tibbets.
  5. Michigan State University. 2008. Which is more important- genetics or ecology? Noon seminar series, host Michelle Johnson.
  6. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 2008. Indirect genetic effects and the lek paradox. Department seminar series, host Rafa Rodriguez.
  7. Tunghai University, Taiwan. 2008. Sperm competition in orb-weaving spiders. Department seminar, host I-Min Tso.
  8. University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. 2007. Sperm competition and the evolution of spermathecael structures in spiders. BEG seminar series, host Michael Sheehan.
  9. University of Indiana-Bloomington. 2007. Resolving the lek paradox; which is more important, genes or ecology? Department seminar, host B. H. Bleakley.
  10. University of Houston. 2005. Genotype x environment interactions and sexually-selected traits: from the lek to the QTL. Department seminar, host Diane Wiernasz.
  11. Ecological Genomics Symposium. 2004. Genotype x environment interactions resolve the lek paradox in an acoustic moth. Invited speaker, Michael Herman and Loretta Johnson.
  12. Gordon Conference on Genes and Behavior. 2004. Genotype x environment interactions resolve the lek paradox in an acoustic moth.  Invited poster, host Gene Robinson.
  13. Ecological Genomics Symposium. 2003. Genotype x environment interactions resolve the lek paradox in an acoustic moth. Invited speaker, host Robert Cohen.
  14. Gordon Conference on Quantitative Genetics. 2003. Plasticity of sexually-selected traits. Invited poster, host Bruce Walsh.
  15. Kansas State University. 2003. Sperm competition and the evolution of spermathecal structures within the Tetragnathidae. Seminar, host Ralph Charlton.
  16. University of Kansas. 2002. A comparative approach to sperm competition and the evolution of spermathecal structures within the Tetragnathidae. Colloquium, host Kate Louden.
  17. University of Missouri-Columbia. 2002.  A comparative approach to sperm competition and the evolution of spermathecal structures within the Tetragnathidae. Department seminar, host Rex Crocroft.

Presentations at National Conferences

  1. Danielson-François, A. 1995. Body condition and mate choice in Tetragnatha elongata. American Society of Zoologists, St. Louis, MO.
  2. Danielson-François, A. 1996. Mating behavior of Tetragnatha elongata. American Arachnological Society, Tucson, AZ.
  3. Danielson-François, A. 2001. Sticky sperm or sperm competition? Why male order does not predict paternity in spiders. Society for the Study of Evolution, Knoxville, TN.
  4. Danielson-François, A. and T. Bukowski. 2001. Equal sperm release by males despite dramatic differences in copulatory duration in a spider: Tetragnatha versicolor (Araneae, Tetragnathidae). Animal Behaviour Society, Corvallis, OR.
  5. Danielson-François, A., Fetterer, C. and P. Smallwood. 2001. Mate choice in an orb-weaving spider: body condition matters. Presented by co-author P. Smallwood. Animal Behaviour Society, Corvallis, OR.
  6. Danielson-François, A. 2002. Evolution of spermathecal structures within the Tetragnathidae. American Arachnological Society, Chico, CA.
  7. Danielson-François, A. 2002. Causes of variation in paternity: differential sperm release versus sperm stratification in two orb-weaving spiders. Animal Behaviour Society, Bloomington, IN. (Honorary Mention Allee Award for Best Student Paper).
  8. Danielson-François, A., Kelly, J.K. and M. D. Greenfield. 2003. Can genotype x environment interactions resolve the lek paradox? Society for the Study of Evolution, Chico, CA.
  9. Danielson-François, A. 2003. Natural history and mating behavior of Glenognatha emertoni (Araneae: Tetragnathidae). American Arachnological Society, Denver, CO.
  10. Danielson-François, A., Kelly, J.K. and M. D. Greenfield. 2004.  Poster: Lek paradox resolved by genotype x environment interactions in an acoustic moth. Keystone Symposium: Natural Variation and Quantitative Genetics in Model Organisms, Breckenridge, CO. (Scholarship winner).
  11. Danielson-François, A., Kelly, J.K. and M. D. Greenfield. 2005. G x E interactions for male attractiveness and competitive genotypes in A. grisella. Society for the Study of Evolution, Fairbanks, AK.
  12. Danielson-François, A. 2005. Tetragnathid spiders as indicators of habitat quality: Environmental influences on sexual maturity in male Leucauge venusta. American Arachnological Society, Akron, OH.
  13. Danielson-François, A. and J. Schuetz. 2006. Poster: Field study of web decoration in a spiny orb-weaver: prey-attraction or web-defense? 2006. Society for the Study of Evolution, Long Island, NY.
  14. Danielson-François, A. Kelly, J.K. and M. D. Greenfield. 2006. Male attractiveness in an acoustic moth: evidence for plasticity and canalization. Society for the Study of Evolution, Long Island, NY.
  15. Danielson-François, A., Zhou, Y., and M. D. Greenfield. 2007. Resolving the lek paradox through indirect genetic effects: nothing in genetics makes sense in the absence of ecology. Animal Behavior Society, Burlington, VT.
  16. Danielson-François, A., Zhou, Y., and M. D. Greenfield. 2008. Resolving the lek paradox: which is more important, genes or ecology? Animal Behavior Society, Snowbird, Utah.
  17. Danielson-François, A. 2009. Competing phenotypes- assessing the impact of indirect genetic effects on sexually-selected traits. Part of NSF-funded symposium panel at the international meetings of the Animal Behavior Society, Pirenopolis, Brazil.
  18. Cole*, N., Hou, C., Min, I., and A. Danielson-François. 2010. Sperm competition and paternity patterns in the Giant Wood spider Nephila pilipes. Evolution meetings, Portland, OR.
  19. Chaalan*, T. and A. Danielson-François. 2010. A potential morphological indicator of sperm competition in spiders. Evolution meetings, Portland, OR.
  20. Lutfi*, S., Gagnon*, S. and A. Danielson-François. 2010. Timing of sperm activation in the funnel-weaving spider Agelenopsis pensylvanica. Evolution meetings, Portland, OR.
  21. Gagnon*, S., Lutfi*, S. and A. Danielson-François. 2010. Sperm release patterns in two species of funnel-weaving spiders (Agelenidae). Evolution meetings, Portland, OR.
  22. Awad*, A. and A. Danielson-François. 2010. The movement of heavy metals through the invertebrate food web. Evolution meetings, Portland, OR.
  23. Danielson-François, A., Awad*, A., and K. Murray. 2010. Tracking pollutants across trophic levels. Evolution meetings, Portland, OR.
  24. Zimmerman*, L., Awad*, A., and A. Danielson-François. An analysis of toxic airborne particulates in urban spider webs in Delray, Detroit MI. National Arachnology Meetings (AAS). Portland OR July 8-13th, 2011.
  25. Awad*, A., and A. Danielson-François. Toxic web- the movement of heavy metals through the invertebrate food web. National Arachnology Meetings (AAS). Portland OR July 8-13th, 2011.
  26. Chaalan*, T., Ford, C. and A. Danielson-François. A potential morphological indicator of sperm competition in spiders. National Arachnology Meetings (AAS). Portland OR July 8-13th, 2011.
  27. Lutfi*, S., Gagnon*, S. and A. Danielson-François. Timing of sperm activation in the funnel-weaving spider Agelenopsis pennsylvanica (Agelenidae). National Arachnology Meetings (AAS). Portland OR July 8-13th, 2011.
  28. Gagnon*, S., Lutfi*, S. and A. Danielson-François. Sperm release patterns in two species of funnel weaving spiders (Agelenidae). National Arachnology Meetings (AAS). Portland OR July 8-13th, 2011.
  29. Drobot*, Y., and A. Danielson-François. Nuptial thief: male spiders steal food from mating partners. National Arachnology Meetings (AAS). Portland OR July 8-13th, 2011.
  30. Hou, C., Tso, I-M. and A. Danielson-François. Paternity patterns in the giant wood spider Nephila pilipes (Araneae: Nephilidae). National Arachnology Meetings (AAS). Portland OR July 8-13th, 2011.
  31. Drobot*, Y. and A. Danielson-François. Nuptial thief: male spiders steal food from mating partners. Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, SICB, Charleston SC, January 3-7, 2012.
  32. Ford*, C. and A. Danielson-François.Sex amongst cannibals: mating behavior in Pirate spiders. Animal Behavior Society (ABS), Albuquerque NM June 9-14, 2012.
  33. Drobot*, Y. and A. Danielson-François. Nuptial thief: male spiders steal food from mating partners Animal Behavior Society (ABS), Albuquerque NM June 9-14, 2012.
  34. Zimmerman*, L., Awad*, A., Gelderloos**, A. and A. Danielson-François. Accumulation of ultra-fine particles of toxic heavy metals in urban spider webs. Animal Behavior Society (ABS), Albuquerque NM June 9-14, 2012.
  35. Khan*, H. and A. Danielson-François. Evidence of sexual selection on spider fang length: long enough to steal with? Animal Behavior Society (ABS), Albuquerque NM June 9-14, 2012.
  36. Dessert*, N., Painter*, D., Llonillo*, R., Natarajan, N. Akingbehin, K. and A. Danielson-François. Using Bio-vision software program to analyze video for animal behavior patterns. Animal Behavior Society (ABS), Albuquerque NM June 9-14, 2012.

Outreach to the Popular Press

"Biology professor is fascinated by creepy crawlies." By Patricia Montemurri, The Detroit Free Press, 2008.

"Some amazing and very gentle spiders." By Terry Gallagher, The Reporter, 2008.

"Researcher has no arachnophobia." By Millard Berry, Dearborn Press and Guide, 2008.

“Spider lovers spin webs for their prey.” By Karen Farkas, Ohio Plain Dealer, 2005.

“Male spiders prefer plumper partners.” Reuters News Service, 2003.

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